Campus Units

History

Document Type

Book Review

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Summer 2007

Journal or Book Title

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft

Volume

2

Issue

1

DOI

10.1353/mrw.0.0085

Abstract

For those whose knowledge of Medea derives primarily from Euripides’ play, Emma Griffiths’s new introduction to this mythical Greek heroine/ villainess will provide a number of surprises. Here they will meet several different Medeas. The one who killed her children is, to be sure, featured prominently but other, less murderous versions of Medea also appear. In addition to Medea the witch there is Medea the ‘‘young, vulnerable girl overwhelmed by love’’ (p. 89). One Medea attempted to kill Theseus but another was a healer and Achilles’ wife in the afterlife. This book, part of Routledge’s series ‘‘Gods and Heroes of the Ancient World,’’ looks at a variety of Medeas as well as a number of different approaches to understanding her myth. It is geared toward (and is, indeed, ideally suited to) the upper level undergraduate course in mythology or classical drama.

Comments

This book review article is published as Hollander, D.B., Review of Emma Griffiths. Medea. Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft. Summer 2007, 2(1); Doi: 10.1353/mrw.0.0085. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

University of Pennsylvania Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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