Campus Units

History

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Fall 2017

Journal or Book Title

Films for the Feminist Classroom

Volume

7

Issue

2

Abstract

Today, interest in women’s work in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) runs high, a natural topic for classroom attention. Two films reviewed here may interest educators seeking to promote understanding and discussion of gender and STEM. The Gender Chip Project follows sophomore-to-senior-year experiences of five female STEM majors at Ohio State University. Multiyear tracking shows these women growing into their studies in engineering, biology, and computers. The women enthuse about their fascination with STEM work and their dreams of discovering life-saving cures or inventions to make communities better. They credit parents with inspiring their determination, independence, and curiosity. Interviews also document the women’s frustration at being patronized by peers and teachers, feeling the need to work twice as hard, and facing problems of low self-confidence as a lone woman amidst male classmates with big attitudes. Conversations about post-graduation paths show these students worrying about family/career balance, even as they tell younger women to look for supportive contacts and to believe that “anything is possible—dream big and work hard.”

Comments

These reviews are published as Amy Bix, Review of two films, “The Gender Chip Project” and “Great Unsung Women on Computing,” Films for the Feminist Classroom (Texas Woman’s University), issue 7.2 (fall, 2017). Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Films for the Feminist Classroom

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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