Date

12-2015 12:00 AM

Major

Political Science

Department

Political Science

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Marcus Crede

Project Advisor's Department

Psychology

Description

Media coverage and anecdotal evidence suggests that teacher job satisfaction has declined since the introduction of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Does the data support this common narrative? By utilizing archival data, job satisfaction rates before and after the implementation of NCLB can be analyzed, and the legislation’s effects on elementary and secondary teachers can be compared to determine whether job satisfaction has actually decreased, and if this change has affected elementary or secondary teachers more. Previously collected, large-scale, nationally representative random survey results were analyzed to determine how overall rates of teacher job satisfaction has changed in the decades surrounding the implementation of NCLB, and how the rate of change has varied between elementary and secondary teachers. The data shows that contrary to popular narrative, teacher job satisfaction for all teachers increased significantly in the years following the implementation of NCLB. These results suggest that NCLB, commonly viewed as an unpopular failure, did not translate into a reduction of teacher job satisfaction.

File Format

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

The No Child Left Behind Era and Teacher Job Satisfaction

Media coverage and anecdotal evidence suggests that teacher job satisfaction has declined since the introduction of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Does the data support this common narrative? By utilizing archival data, job satisfaction rates before and after the implementation of NCLB can be analyzed, and the legislation’s effects on elementary and secondary teachers can be compared to determine whether job satisfaction has actually decreased, and if this change has affected elementary or secondary teachers more. Previously collected, large-scale, nationally representative random survey results were analyzed to determine how overall rates of teacher job satisfaction has changed in the decades surrounding the implementation of NCLB, and how the rate of change has varied between elementary and secondary teachers. The data shows that contrary to popular narrative, teacher job satisfaction for all teachers increased significantly in the years following the implementation of NCLB. These results suggest that NCLB, commonly viewed as an unpopular failure, did not translate into a reduction of teacher job satisfaction.