Date

12-2015 12:00 AM

Major

Materials Engineering

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

College

College of Engineering

Project Advisor

Nastaran Hashemi

Project Advisor's Department

Mechanical Engineering

Description

Organ-on-a-chip technology utilizes microfluidics to create an environment for cell culture that represents basic organ function. These dynamic cell culture models are promising tools for improving drug testing methods and investigating how cells respond to a variety of stimuli. At the time of the project inception, no published work was available on applying organ-on-a-chip technology to develop an in-vitro model for the placenta, an important organ. The placenta’s main function is to transport nutrients, waste and other substances between the mother and developing fetus. A microfluidic platform to replicate the placental barrier was designed based on studying other organ-on-a-chip devices. The microfluidic chip was produced utilizing standard microfabrication techniques. The next step is to successfully culture cells inside the device and validate the design. We anticipate the placenta-on-a-chip can ultimately be used to better understand the exchange of substances between maternal and fetal bloodstreams and determine the risks of certain drugs or chemicals to a developing baby.

File Format

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Placenta-on-a-chip: Developing an in-vitro platform to mimic substance transport

Organ-on-a-chip technology utilizes microfluidics to create an environment for cell culture that represents basic organ function. These dynamic cell culture models are promising tools for improving drug testing methods and investigating how cells respond to a variety of stimuli. At the time of the project inception, no published work was available on applying organ-on-a-chip technology to develop an in-vitro model for the placenta, an important organ. The placenta’s main function is to transport nutrients, waste and other substances between the mother and developing fetus. A microfluidic platform to replicate the placental barrier was designed based on studying other organ-on-a-chip devices. The microfluidic chip was produced utilizing standard microfabrication techniques. The next step is to successfully culture cells inside the device and validate the design. We anticipate the placenta-on-a-chip can ultimately be used to better understand the exchange of substances between maternal and fetal bloodstreams and determine the risks of certain drugs or chemicals to a developing baby.