Date

12-2015 12:00 AM

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Department

Mechanical Engineering

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Christopher Harrison

Project Advisor's Department

Naval Science

Description

This report investigates the link between marksmanship, academic performance and fitness. The results of this project may establish justification to sustain and grow the Iowa State Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) marksmanship program. To investigate the link between marksmanship and fitness the student used a pulse oximeter to measure pulses and blood oxygen saturations of both new NROTC marksmen and non-marksmen. The student collected self-reported GPA’s before and after joining the marksmanship program, to study the link between marksmanship and academic performance. The student also issued a survey to assess the impact of marksmanship on concentration, stress levels, confidence, and attention to detail. Finally, the student examined the link between marksmanship performance, pulse, and oxygen saturation to determine whether marksmanship proficiency affected fitness. Marksmen had higher pulses than non-marksmen. However, marksmanship practice did not appreciably impact oxygen saturation. Marksmanship training did not significantly impact GPA’s. However, marksmen reported equal or better concentration, confidence, and attention to detail since starting marksmanship. Among more experienced marksmen, accuracy scores increased when heart rates decreased and oxygen saturation increased. There may be a correlation between marksmanship, fitness, and academics, but larger samples and experienced or competitive collegiate marksmen are required to clarify conclusions.

File Format

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Marksmanship Mind Body Alignment

This report investigates the link between marksmanship, academic performance and fitness. The results of this project may establish justification to sustain and grow the Iowa State Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) marksmanship program. To investigate the link between marksmanship and fitness the student used a pulse oximeter to measure pulses and blood oxygen saturations of both new NROTC marksmen and non-marksmen. The student collected self-reported GPA’s before and after joining the marksmanship program, to study the link between marksmanship and academic performance. The student also issued a survey to assess the impact of marksmanship on concentration, stress levels, confidence, and attention to detail. Finally, the student examined the link between marksmanship performance, pulse, and oxygen saturation to determine whether marksmanship proficiency affected fitness. Marksmen had higher pulses than non-marksmen. However, marksmanship practice did not appreciably impact oxygen saturation. Marksmanship training did not significantly impact GPA’s. However, marksmen reported equal or better concentration, confidence, and attention to detail since starting marksmanship. Among more experienced marksmen, accuracy scores increased when heart rates decreased and oxygen saturation increased. There may be a correlation between marksmanship, fitness, and academics, but larger samples and experienced or competitive collegiate marksmen are required to clarify conclusions.