Event Title

Exudate Content of Exotic and Native plant species under Nitrogen Soil Stress

Date

12-2015 12:00 AM

Major

Chemistry

Department

Chemistry

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Lori Biederman

Project Advisor's Department

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology

Description

Exudates are organic compounds released by plant roots to assist the root in navigating through soil, eliminating competition among rival plant species, and supporting mychorrhiza, if present. Mycorrihizial fungi that form symbiotic relationships with plant roots. The plant provides carbon-based compounds and amino acids to the mychorrhiza and in exchange the fungi provides more nitrogen and phosphorus for the plant. Ratibita pinnata, a native plant, form relationships with mycorrhizal fungi, while Leucanthemum vulgare, an exotic species, is likely to not form these relationships. Studies suggest that there may be a relationship between the amount of exudates released and what particular amino acids exuded based on the presence of mychorrhiza. In this study we tested this hypothesis, while also analyzing how the concentration of exudates is impacted by high and low nitrogen fertilizer application using a modified exudate collection method for pine trees (Pinus species) and using mass spectrometry to analyze exudate content. While we failed to collected detectable amounts of exudate material, the chamber design did allow for root growth and modifications were made for field deployment

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Exudate Content of Exotic and Native plant species under Nitrogen Soil Stress

Exudates are organic compounds released by plant roots to assist the root in navigating through soil, eliminating competition among rival plant species, and supporting mychorrhiza, if present. Mycorrihizial fungi that form symbiotic relationships with plant roots. The plant provides carbon-based compounds and amino acids to the mychorrhiza and in exchange the fungi provides more nitrogen and phosphorus for the plant. Ratibita pinnata, a native plant, form relationships with mycorrhizal fungi, while Leucanthemum vulgare, an exotic species, is likely to not form these relationships. Studies suggest that there may be a relationship between the amount of exudates released and what particular amino acids exuded based on the presence of mychorrhiza. In this study we tested this hypothesis, while also analyzing how the concentration of exudates is impacted by high and low nitrogen fertilizer application using a modified exudate collection method for pine trees (Pinus species) and using mass spectrometry to analyze exudate content. While we failed to collected detectable amounts of exudate material, the chamber design did allow for root growth and modifications were made for field deployment