Date

12-2015 12:00 AM

Major

Biology

Department

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology

College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Project Advisor

Jeanine Aune

Project Advisor's Department

English

Description

Disease represents a strong driving force of societal and cultural change, which repeats itself today. During the 14th century, the Plague ravaged Europe, and fear of illness, destruction, and hopelessness changed society. Fear of the Plague altered the religious climate of the entire continent and drove many to commit acts of violence. Lack of knowledge about the Plague changed the way medicine was taught and practiced, moving towards modern medicine. Governments began to take a more active role in the health of the citizens, and national legislation began having greater impacts at the local level. The centuries old economic structure began to crumble, setting the stage for more balanced, free-market trade. Those factors—mentality, medicine, law, and economics—elicited similar reactions in the 2014 Ebola Outbreak. Fear of Ebola resulted in violence. Medical researchers were inspired by the outbreak to learn more about Ebola and are looking for potential cures and vaccines. Laws restricting travel and advocating healthy practices dominated the infected countries. The economies of the diseased areas suffered. Little has changed in the nature of people in medieval Europe and today; though centuries have passed, societies respond to disease in the same fundamental ways. Disease represents a strong driving force of societal and cultural change, which repeats itself today. During the 14th century, the Plague ravaged Europe, and fear of illness, destruction, and hopelessness changed society. Fear of the Plague altered the religious climate of the entire continent and drove many to commit acts of violence. Lack of knowledge about the Plague changed the way medicine was taught and practiced, moving towards modern medicine. Governments began to take a more active role in the health of the citizens, and national legislation began having greater impacts at the local level. The centuries old economic structure began to crumble, setting the stage for more balanced, free-market trade. Those factors—mentality, medicine, law, and economics—elicited similar reactions in the 2014 Ebola Outbreak. Fear of Ebola resulted in violence. Medical researchers were inspired by the outbreak to learn more about Ebola and are looking for potential cures and vaccines. Laws restricting travel and advocating healthy practices dominated the infected countries. The economies of the diseased areas suffered. Little has changed in the nature of people in medieval Europe and today; though centuries have passed, societies respond to disease in the same fundamental ways.

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

The Effects of the 14th-Century Plague on Medieval European Society and Parallels in the 2014 Ebola Outbreak

Disease represents a strong driving force of societal and cultural change, which repeats itself today. During the 14th century, the Plague ravaged Europe, and fear of illness, destruction, and hopelessness changed society. Fear of the Plague altered the religious climate of the entire continent and drove many to commit acts of violence. Lack of knowledge about the Plague changed the way medicine was taught and practiced, moving towards modern medicine. Governments began to take a more active role in the health of the citizens, and national legislation began having greater impacts at the local level. The centuries old economic structure began to crumble, setting the stage for more balanced, free-market trade. Those factors—mentality, medicine, law, and economics—elicited similar reactions in the 2014 Ebola Outbreak. Fear of Ebola resulted in violence. Medical researchers were inspired by the outbreak to learn more about Ebola and are looking for potential cures and vaccines. Laws restricting travel and advocating healthy practices dominated the infected countries. The economies of the diseased areas suffered. Little has changed in the nature of people in medieval Europe and today; though centuries have passed, societies respond to disease in the same fundamental ways. Disease represents a strong driving force of societal and cultural change, which repeats itself today. During the 14th century, the Plague ravaged Europe, and fear of illness, destruction, and hopelessness changed society. Fear of the Plague altered the religious climate of the entire continent and drove many to commit acts of violence. Lack of knowledge about the Plague changed the way medicine was taught and practiced, moving towards modern medicine. Governments began to take a more active role in the health of the citizens, and national legislation began having greater impacts at the local level. The centuries old economic structure began to crumble, setting the stage for more balanced, free-market trade. Those factors—mentality, medicine, law, and economics—elicited similar reactions in the 2014 Ebola Outbreak. Fear of Ebola resulted in violence. Medical researchers were inspired by the outbreak to learn more about Ebola and are looking for potential cures and vaccines. Laws restricting travel and advocating healthy practices dominated the infected countries. The economies of the diseased areas suffered. Little has changed in the nature of people in medieval Europe and today; though centuries have passed, societies respond to disease in the same fundamental ways.