Date

1-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Dietetics; Family & Consumer Sciences Education and Studies

Department

Food Science & Human Nutrition

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Sarah Francis

Project Advisor's Department

Food Science & Human Nutrition

Description

Older adults are a diverse population with many life experiences. Food is an important part of their lives from cultural and physiological perspectives. As adults age, food and physical activity can promote better health and quality of life. This study took place in an independent living facility. Independent living facility residents live in their own apartments where they cook their own meals and choose their own physical activity. Two methods of nutrition education, in-person and online lessons, were used to discuss key areas of concern for older adults: meal planning, physical activity, protein, and produce consumption. Participants completed interviews to gather perspectives on their community and perceptions of food and nutrition. These results determined topics of interest. Participants also completed the Dietary Screening Tool at the beginning (pre-) and end (post-) of the educational series to assess changes in dietary intake frequency and nutritional risk. Participants were divided into two groups to complete nutrition education in one of the formats. Participants completed post-pre questionnaires to assess self-reported change in familiarity and intention to change. Results were not significant due to a small, non-diverse sample. However, the results suggested a shift toward higher familiarity and likelihood to apply changes.

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Nutrition Commons

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Efficacy of Two Nutrition Education Methods for Older Adults in an Independent Living Community

Older adults are a diverse population with many life experiences. Food is an important part of their lives from cultural and physiological perspectives. As adults age, food and physical activity can promote better health and quality of life. This study took place in an independent living facility. Independent living facility residents live in their own apartments where they cook their own meals and choose their own physical activity. Two methods of nutrition education, in-person and online lessons, were used to discuss key areas of concern for older adults: meal planning, physical activity, protein, and produce consumption. Participants completed interviews to gather perspectives on their community and perceptions of food and nutrition. These results determined topics of interest. Participants also completed the Dietary Screening Tool at the beginning (pre-) and end (post-) of the educational series to assess changes in dietary intake frequency and nutritional risk. Participants were divided into two groups to complete nutrition education in one of the formats. Participants completed post-pre questionnaires to assess self-reported change in familiarity and intention to change. Results were not significant due to a small, non-diverse sample. However, the results suggested a shift toward higher familiarity and likelihood to apply changes.