Event Title

Analyzing Poverty Factors and Livelihood Systems in Rural India

Date

1-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Genetics

Department

Genetics, Development and Cell Biology

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Robert Mazur

Project Advisor's Department

Sociology

Description

As a developing country with a population surpassing 1 billion, India faces a myriad of challenges in securing the access and provision of quality healthcare services. To develop my understanding of the multi-dimensional health system of India, I traveled to rural Maharashtra for a two month program. I shadowed doctors in privately-owned clinics, government-run centers and non-profit organizations, visited a consultation and treatment center for those living with HIV/AIDS, and traveled to remote villages with a free mobile clinic. I developed a portfolio documenting my daily log of hours, weekly activities and personal reflections. My time in the general consultation clinics contributed greatly to my knowledge of national vaccination strategies, diagnostics, treatment, regional prevalence of infectious diseases, and challenges faced in securing effective patient interactions at each of these stages. The conditions I most commonly observed were tuberculosis, malnutrition, and respiratory, gastrointestinal and dermal infections. By stepping beyond textbooks and personally facing the conditions of vulnerable communities in rural India, I witnessed the crowded populations, hazardous housing, poor sanitation, and insufficient infrastructure that perpetuate the spread of infection and disease. My research cemented the reality and complexity of healthcare problems in developing countries, concluding that future solutions cannot be successful without addressing the intertwined epidemics of poverty and education.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Analyzing Poverty Factors and Livelihood Systems in Rural India

As a developing country with a population surpassing 1 billion, India faces a myriad of challenges in securing the access and provision of quality healthcare services. To develop my understanding of the multi-dimensional health system of India, I traveled to rural Maharashtra for a two month program. I shadowed doctors in privately-owned clinics, government-run centers and non-profit organizations, visited a consultation and treatment center for those living with HIV/AIDS, and traveled to remote villages with a free mobile clinic. I developed a portfolio documenting my daily log of hours, weekly activities and personal reflections. My time in the general consultation clinics contributed greatly to my knowledge of national vaccination strategies, diagnostics, treatment, regional prevalence of infectious diseases, and challenges faced in securing effective patient interactions at each of these stages. The conditions I most commonly observed were tuberculosis, malnutrition, and respiratory, gastrointestinal and dermal infections. By stepping beyond textbooks and personally facing the conditions of vulnerable communities in rural India, I witnessed the crowded populations, hazardous housing, poor sanitation, and insufficient infrastructure that perpetuate the spread of infection and disease. My research cemented the reality and complexity of healthcare problems in developing countries, concluding that future solutions cannot be successful without addressing the intertwined epidemics of poverty and education.