Event Title

Exercise and the Emotional Health of College Students

Date

1-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Kinesiology and Health

Department

Kinesiology

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Panteleimon Ekkekakis

Project Advisor's Department

Kinesiology

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this review was to determine the effects of exercise on depression, self-concept, and stress among college students. The transition to college can be a significant trigger for mental health problems. College students face the simultaneous challenges of having to adapt to an unfamiliar social environment and having to cope with academic stress. A non-pharmacological treatment option for students facing mental health problems would be valuable due to the low cost and absence of negative side effects. However, the effects of exercise on depression, self-concept, and stress among college students are understudied. Methods: Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO) were searched for relevant research articles. Pertinent information was extracted and tabulated. Results: Twelve relevant articles. Three were experimental designs and eight were correlational or cross-sectional designs. Higher levels of physical activity correlated with lower levels of stress and depression, as well as higher levels of self-esteem. Conclusions: Exercise may be a useful method of preventing or alleviating mental health problems that college students face. Both cardiovascular and resistance programs have been shown to lower depressive symptoms, reduce stress, and improve self-esteem.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Exercise and the Emotional Health of College Students

Purpose: The purpose of this review was to determine the effects of exercise on depression, self-concept, and stress among college students. The transition to college can be a significant trigger for mental health problems. College students face the simultaneous challenges of having to adapt to an unfamiliar social environment and having to cope with academic stress. A non-pharmacological treatment option for students facing mental health problems would be valuable due to the low cost and absence of negative side effects. However, the effects of exercise on depression, self-concept, and stress among college students are understudied. Methods: Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO) were searched for relevant research articles. Pertinent information was extracted and tabulated. Results: Twelve relevant articles. Three were experimental designs and eight were correlational or cross-sectional designs. Higher levels of physical activity correlated with lower levels of stress and depression, as well as higher levels of self-esteem. Conclusions: Exercise may be a useful method of preventing or alleviating mental health problems that college students face. Both cardiovascular and resistance programs have been shown to lower depressive symptoms, reduce stress, and improve self-esteem.