Date

1-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Global Resource Systems

Department

Global Resource Systems

College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Project Advisor

Gail Nonnecke

Project Advisor's Department

Global Resource Systems

Description

Voluntary family planning is internationally recognized as a cost-effective public health intervention to prevent life-threatening or unwanted births. Peru has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in South America and numbers are disproportionately high in rural, impoverished, and indigenous communities in the Loreto District. Thirty interviews were conducted with community members of reproductive age in Iquitos (urban), Mazan (semi-urban), and Santo Tomas (rural) of the Loreto district to determine accessibility, usage, and perceptions of contraception. Of the 22 respondents who did not desire more children, half were not using any modern form of contraception. Government policy has eliminated cost as a barrier to accessible contraception, leaving inconsistent availability of desired birth control and unexpected side effects as reasons most cited for non-usage. Family planning was considered an issue exclusive to women and male condoms were among the least utilized methods of contraception. Findings suggest a need for increase health information for women seeking voluntary contraception and outreach to men and adolescents.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Meeting the Need for Family Planning in Loreto, Peru

Voluntary family planning is internationally recognized as a cost-effective public health intervention to prevent life-threatening or unwanted births. Peru has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in South America and numbers are disproportionately high in rural, impoverished, and indigenous communities in the Loreto District. Thirty interviews were conducted with community members of reproductive age in Iquitos (urban), Mazan (semi-urban), and Santo Tomas (rural) of the Loreto district to determine accessibility, usage, and perceptions of contraception. Of the 22 respondents who did not desire more children, half were not using any modern form of contraception. Government policy has eliminated cost as a barrier to accessible contraception, leaving inconsistent availability of desired birth control and unexpected side effects as reasons most cited for non-usage. Family planning was considered an issue exclusive to women and male condoms were among the least utilized methods of contraception. Findings suggest a need for increase health information for women seeking voluntary contraception and outreach to men and adolescents.