Event Title

Carbon Dioxide Management through Microbial Carbonate Precipitation

Date

1-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Chemical Engineering; Biochemistry

Department

Chemical and Biological Engineering

College

College of Engineering

Project Advisor

Mark Rasmusssen

Project Advisor's Department

Animal Science

Description

Ever since the Industrial Revolution, carbon dioxide levels within the atmosphere have increased significantly. Magnesium and calcium minerals have been demonstrated to react with carbon dioxide, and sequester it as a solid carbonate compound on a geological timescale. There are a number of carbon sequestration processes that are currently in development, but few utilize microbial metabolic pathways or are prepared to be implemented in large scale applications such as a fossil fuel power plant. In this work, a process for large scale carbon dioxide removal using soil bacteria with enzymatic activity is proposed, able to convert over 40,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate. The cost of annual manufacturing is expected to exceed $27 million, due to the acquisition of mineral materials where carbon dioxide is not produced as a byproduct. The key factors to a biological sequestration process are evaluated, and the use in industrial applications is discussed.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Carbon Dioxide Management through Microbial Carbonate Precipitation

Ever since the Industrial Revolution, carbon dioxide levels within the atmosphere have increased significantly. Magnesium and calcium minerals have been demonstrated to react with carbon dioxide, and sequester it as a solid carbonate compound on a geological timescale. There are a number of carbon sequestration processes that are currently in development, but few utilize microbial metabolic pathways or are prepared to be implemented in large scale applications such as a fossil fuel power plant. In this work, a process for large scale carbon dioxide removal using soil bacteria with enzymatic activity is proposed, able to convert over 40,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate. The cost of annual manufacturing is expected to exceed $27 million, due to the acquisition of mineral materials where carbon dioxide is not produced as a byproduct. The key factors to a biological sequestration process are evaluated, and the use in industrial applications is discussed.