Event Title

CINV Survey

Date

27-4-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Biology

Department

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Chad Johannes

Project Advisor's Department

Veterinary Clinical Sciences

Description

Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common side effect of chemotherapeutic treatment experienced by dogs that can lower quality of life and functionality. These symptoms are likewise found in people receiving chemotherapy; however, human oncology has well-established protocols for preventing these side effects, while veterinary medicine does not. The objective of this research is to establish a baseline regarding current standard of care to determine how veterinary specialists are managing CINV in dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common side effect of chemotherapeutic treatment experienced by dogs that can lower quality of life and functionality. These symptoms are likewise found in people receiving chemotherapy; however, human oncology has well-established protocols for preventing these side effects, while veterinary medicine does not. The objective of this research is to establish a baseline regarding current standard of care to determine how veterinary specialists are managing CINV in dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Materials & Methods: This research will be conducted through an online survey that will be sent via listserv to approximately 1800 veterinary specialists who utilize chemotherapy to treat dogs with cancer. The survey will inquire whether or not they accompany the most common chemotherapy treatments with prophylactic antiemetic therapy in order to prevent vomiting in dogs on Day 1 and Days 2-5 as well as to estimate the likelihood of vomiting expected during the given time periods. The veterinary specialists will then be asked to depict what types of antiemetic therapies they use to prophylactically or reactively treat vomiting. Finally, the veterinary specialists will be asked to indicate the most common appetite stimulants they use in treatment of inappetence for dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Results: The results are pending. IRB exemption has been submitted. Test runs to verify readability of the survey are underway currently. The survey should be sent out mid-March and the responses should be received early to mid-April.

Conclusion: Due to a lack of available results, the conclusion of this research is yet to be determined.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 AM

CINV Survey

Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common side effect of chemotherapeutic treatment experienced by dogs that can lower quality of life and functionality. These symptoms are likewise found in people receiving chemotherapy; however, human oncology has well-established protocols for preventing these side effects, while veterinary medicine does not. The objective of this research is to establish a baseline regarding current standard of care to determine how veterinary specialists are managing CINV in dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common side effect of chemotherapeutic treatment experienced by dogs that can lower quality of life and functionality. These symptoms are likewise found in people receiving chemotherapy; however, human oncology has well-established protocols for preventing these side effects, while veterinary medicine does not. The objective of this research is to establish a baseline regarding current standard of care to determine how veterinary specialists are managing CINV in dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Materials & Methods: This research will be conducted through an online survey that will be sent via listserv to approximately 1800 veterinary specialists who utilize chemotherapy to treat dogs with cancer. The survey will inquire whether or not they accompany the most common chemotherapy treatments with prophylactic antiemetic therapy in order to prevent vomiting in dogs on Day 1 and Days 2-5 as well as to estimate the likelihood of vomiting expected during the given time periods. The veterinary specialists will then be asked to depict what types of antiemetic therapies they use to prophylactically or reactively treat vomiting. Finally, the veterinary specialists will be asked to indicate the most common appetite stimulants they use in treatment of inappetence for dogs receiving chemotherapy.

Results: The results are pending. IRB exemption has been submitted. Test runs to verify readability of the survey are underway currently. The survey should be sent out mid-March and the responses should be received early to mid-April.

Conclusion: Due to a lack of available results, the conclusion of this research is yet to be determined.