Event Title

Phenomenological movement mapping for orthogonal space and curved space

Date

12-2016 12:00 AM

Major

Architecture

College

Design

Project Advisor

Peter Goche

Project Advisor's Department

Architecture

Description

There are many ways to test whether an architectural space is functional, comfortable, physically sustainable and even at times fashionable. However, except function and style, architectural spaces sometimes seek to fulfill humans’ specific spiritual needs. Physical records and precedent data are not efficient for designers to reach occupancies’ phenomenological notion of the space. This project aimed to map occupancies’ phenomenological movement tracks within orthogonal space and curved space. A pavilion with orthogonal and curved surfaces was set up with in College of Design for one week. Visitors were invited to draw their movement track on scaled floor plan of the pavilion when they finished their exploration of the space. Instead of mapping their actual movement within the pavilion, this project recorded movement happened in occupancies’ mind. I scanned these filled floor plans and overlaid them in one diagram. I generated the conclusion through analysis of this diagram and observation of occupancies’ movement. Compared to an orthogonal space, a curved space may not lead to richer interactions in physical sense. However, a curved space can help occupancies link the external space and their movement. By doing this, architectural spaces help them frame there memory, preserving every moment with in the space.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Phenomenological movement mapping for orthogonal space and curved space

There are many ways to test whether an architectural space is functional, comfortable, physically sustainable and even at times fashionable. However, except function and style, architectural spaces sometimes seek to fulfill humans’ specific spiritual needs. Physical records and precedent data are not efficient for designers to reach occupancies’ phenomenological notion of the space. This project aimed to map occupancies’ phenomenological movement tracks within orthogonal space and curved space. A pavilion with orthogonal and curved surfaces was set up with in College of Design for one week. Visitors were invited to draw their movement track on scaled floor plan of the pavilion when they finished their exploration of the space. Instead of mapping their actual movement within the pavilion, this project recorded movement happened in occupancies’ mind. I scanned these filled floor plans and overlaid them in one diagram. I generated the conclusion through analysis of this diagram and observation of occupancies’ movement. Compared to an orthogonal space, a curved space may not lead to richer interactions in physical sense. However, a curved space can help occupancies link the external space and their movement. By doing this, architectural spaces help them frame there memory, preserving every moment with in the space.