Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Animal Science

Department

Animal Science

College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Project Advisor

Stephanie Hansen

Project Advisor's Department

Animal Science

Description

A comparative study of the CowManager tag versus visual observations was conducted to measure the efficacy of cow behavior measuring technologies. The study used 30 Angus cross beef steers grouped into pens of 6. The steers were monitored once a week every other week for a total of 6 days. Each observation period was within 4 hours from the hours of 7am to 11am using the scanning method at an interval of 5 minutes. The behaviors that were monitored by the observer and CowManager technology included time spent ruminating, eating, and being active. Each behavior time was put on an hour time scale and compared. After SAS analysis there was no statistical difference in the time spent ruminating when using observational methods versus those that the CowManager reported. However, there was a statistical difference in time spent eating when comparing observational and CowManager data. The CowManager data appeared to under report the amount of time spent eating. These results indicate that CowManager tags can accurately measure rumination time but are unable to accurately measure feeding time when used in beef cattle production systems. This is significant for beef cattle research and industries looking to use this technology.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Comparative Study on Efficacy of CowManager Technology

A comparative study of the CowManager tag versus visual observations was conducted to measure the efficacy of cow behavior measuring technologies. The study used 30 Angus cross beef steers grouped into pens of 6. The steers were monitored once a week every other week for a total of 6 days. Each observation period was within 4 hours from the hours of 7am to 11am using the scanning method at an interval of 5 minutes. The behaviors that were monitored by the observer and CowManager technology included time spent ruminating, eating, and being active. Each behavior time was put on an hour time scale and compared. After SAS analysis there was no statistical difference in the time spent ruminating when using observational methods versus those that the CowManager reported. However, there was a statistical difference in time spent eating when comparing observational and CowManager data. The CowManager data appeared to under report the amount of time spent eating. These results indicate that CowManager tags can accurately measure rumination time but are unable to accurately measure feeding time when used in beef cattle production systems. This is significant for beef cattle research and industries looking to use this technology.