Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Genetics

Department

Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Sayali Kukday

Project Advisor's Department

Genetics, Development and Cell Biology

Description

Information Literacy (IL) is the ability to effectively locate, evaluate, and synthesize information to enhance one’s knowledge. The development of IL skills is a curricular goal for undergraduate biology programs at large public universities. Studies show that there is a discrepancy between students’ perception of their ability to locate credible scientific sources, and their actual ability to do so. The first step in developing these skills is the knowledge of the type, quality, and source of information. Efforts have been made to facilitate the development of these skills in advanced biology courses, but to a lesser extent in introductory courses. In this study, we assessed the impact of a semester-long project, designed to address this need, on the ability of students to categorize sources of scientific information. Student responses to questions about published scientific literature were collected pre- and post- semester. Using qualitative coding, we identified emerging themes centered around students’ descriptions of various scientific resources. Our results indicate a greater understanding of the function of published scientific literature as result of the scientific process and confirm the need to provide continued training in the development of information literacy skills.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Undergraduate Perceptions of Scientific Literature: The Role of Research Projects in Introductory Biology Courses

Information Literacy (IL) is the ability to effectively locate, evaluate, and synthesize information to enhance one’s knowledge. The development of IL skills is a curricular goal for undergraduate biology programs at large public universities. Studies show that there is a discrepancy between students’ perception of their ability to locate credible scientific sources, and their actual ability to do so. The first step in developing these skills is the knowledge of the type, quality, and source of information. Efforts have been made to facilitate the development of these skills in advanced biology courses, but to a lesser extent in introductory courses. In this study, we assessed the impact of a semester-long project, designed to address this need, on the ability of students to categorize sources of scientific information. Student responses to questions about published scientific literature were collected pre- and post- semester. Using qualitative coding, we identified emerging themes centered around students’ descriptions of various scientific resources. Our results indicate a greater understanding of the function of published scientific literature as result of the scientific process and confirm the need to provide continued training in the development of information literacy skills.