Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Nutritional Science

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Lorraine Lanningham-Foster

Project Advisor's Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Description

Childhood obesity is considered to be one of the greatest public health challenges of this century, especially considering the impact of this disease on the future health and life expectancy of Iowans as well as US Citizens. School-based programs designed to improve health behaviors are one important strategy for solving obesity. Presently in Iowa we are disseminating the United States Department of Agriculture-funded SWITCH program: School Wellness Integration Targeting Child Health. The message of SWITCH is to help children to switch what they “Do, View, and Chew”. From a nutrition perspective, children are encouraged to consume more fruits and vegetables. 87% of the U.S. population is not meeting the recommendation for vegetable intake, including 93% of all children. As part of the evaluation of the SWITCH program in Iowa, our research team is using visual estimation methods to understand how SWITCH might influence children’s dietary intake. Dietary intake from students in SWITCH schools or non-SWITCH schools will be estimated using plate waste methodology. The current study focus is to compare different visual estimation systems. Our hypothesis is that the quarter estimation system will have greater accuracy and precision compared to the third and eighth estimation systems.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Visual estimation of dietary intake during school lunch for Iowan students

Childhood obesity is considered to be one of the greatest public health challenges of this century, especially considering the impact of this disease on the future health and life expectancy of Iowans as well as US Citizens. School-based programs designed to improve health behaviors are one important strategy for solving obesity. Presently in Iowa we are disseminating the United States Department of Agriculture-funded SWITCH program: School Wellness Integration Targeting Child Health. The message of SWITCH is to help children to switch what they “Do, View, and Chew”. From a nutrition perspective, children are encouraged to consume more fruits and vegetables. 87% of the U.S. population is not meeting the recommendation for vegetable intake, including 93% of all children. As part of the evaluation of the SWITCH program in Iowa, our research team is using visual estimation methods to understand how SWITCH might influence children’s dietary intake. Dietary intake from students in SWITCH schools or non-SWITCH schools will be estimated using plate waste methodology. The current study focus is to compare different visual estimation systems. Our hypothesis is that the quarter estimation system will have greater accuracy and precision compared to the third and eighth estimation systems.