Event Title

Social Identity of Heritage Speakers

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Linguistics, Psychology

Department

English

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

John Levis

Project Advisor's Department

English

Description

The present study focused on the social identity of heritage speakers (HS) of other languages living in the United States. The purpose was to analyze and interpret common themes among HS of different language backgrounds who may or may not have taken courses for improving their heritage language (HL). Participants volunteered to participate in an online survey adapted with a combination of fill in the blank and interval questions regarding proficiency level in their HL and dominant language (DL). The results of the study suggest similarities across HS of diverse backgrounds. HSs living in the United States typically identified themselves as a mix of both cultures. Participants born in the United States were more likely to identify themselves as having adapted more to American culture. Participants had a positive view of their HL and found that it gave them many opportunities, setting them apart from other students. The results also showed that most HS did not take classes to improve their language abilities despite varying levels of proficiency in their HL.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Social Identity of Heritage Speakers

The present study focused on the social identity of heritage speakers (HS) of other languages living in the United States. The purpose was to analyze and interpret common themes among HS of different language backgrounds who may or may not have taken courses for improving their heritage language (HL). Participants volunteered to participate in an online survey adapted with a combination of fill in the blank and interval questions regarding proficiency level in their HL and dominant language (DL). The results of the study suggest similarities across HS of diverse backgrounds. HSs living in the United States typically identified themselves as a mix of both cultures. Participants born in the United States were more likely to identify themselves as having adapted more to American culture. Participants had a positive view of their HL and found that it gave them many opportunities, setting them apart from other students. The results also showed that most HS did not take classes to improve their language abilities despite varying levels of proficiency in their HL.