Event Title

Effects of speed and grade on plantar fascia strain during walking

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Kinesiology and Health

Department

Kinesiology

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Tim Derrick

Project Advisor's Department

Kinesiology

Description

Plantar fasciitis is a common pathology caused by increased plantar fascia strain. Factors affecting plantar fascia strain are relatively unknown. In order to determine the effects of two variables (incline and speed) on plantar fascia strain during walking, 3 participants were asked to walk for one minute at 6 different conditions. This 6 different conditions were all possible combinations of the participant's typical walking speed and a speed 20% greater than their typical walking speed, 0°, 5°, and 10° incline. Plantar fascia strain was defined as the length of the plantar fascia during the walking trials relative to its length during quiet standing. The results show that plantar fascia strain increased due to both an increase in speed and an increase in grade. There was a moderate speed effect, and while there was no effect between 0° and 5° grades, there was a large grade effect between 0° and 10° grades and 5° and 10° grades. While the differences in plantar fascia strain were small, the effect sizes calculated suggest that the differences will reach significance as more subjects complete this ongoing study.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Effects of speed and grade on plantar fascia strain during walking

Plantar fasciitis is a common pathology caused by increased plantar fascia strain. Factors affecting plantar fascia strain are relatively unknown. In order to determine the effects of two variables (incline and speed) on plantar fascia strain during walking, 3 participants were asked to walk for one minute at 6 different conditions. This 6 different conditions were all possible combinations of the participant's typical walking speed and a speed 20% greater than their typical walking speed, 0°, 5°, and 10° incline. Plantar fascia strain was defined as the length of the plantar fascia during the walking trials relative to its length during quiet standing. The results show that plantar fascia strain increased due to both an increase in speed and an increase in grade. There was a moderate speed effect, and while there was no effect between 0° and 5° grades, there was a large grade effect between 0° and 10° grades and 5° and 10° grades. While the differences in plantar fascia strain were small, the effect sizes calculated suggest that the differences will reach significance as more subjects complete this ongoing study.