Event Title

Whole Egg Consumption as a Dietary Prevention and Treatment Intervention Increases Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 Concentrations in Rats with DSS-Induced Colitis

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Nutritional Science

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Kevin Schalinske

Project Advisor's Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Description

It has been shown that vitamin D deficiency can result from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the use of a whole egg diet as an approach to maintain vitamin D homeostasis in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Rats (N=54) were randomly assigned to 3 diet groups: control casein (n=30), whole egg (n=12), or casein with supplemental vitamin D3 (n=12). A 6 wk pre-DSS period was followed by a 6 wk post-DSS period. After pre-DSS period, 6 rats from each diet group received DSS-treated water for 7 d. All but 18 casein-fed rats were sacrificed after colitis was induced. These 18 post-DSS treatment rats were divided into the same 3 diet groups for the final 6 wk. Pre-DSS control and DSS-treated rats on whole egg diet had serum 25-(OH)-vitamin D3 (25D) concentrations 78% higher than rats on the control casein diet, whereas D3 supplementation was without effect on serum 25D concentrations regardless of IBD status. Rats switched to whole egg after DSS-administration had serum 25D concentrations 74% higher than rats fed the casein with supplemental D3 diet. This may support new dietary recommendations regarding whole egg consumption as a strategy for vitamin D deficiency management in IBD.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Whole Egg Consumption as a Dietary Prevention and Treatment Intervention Increases Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 Concentrations in Rats with DSS-Induced Colitis

It has been shown that vitamin D deficiency can result from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the use of a whole egg diet as an approach to maintain vitamin D homeostasis in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Rats (N=54) were randomly assigned to 3 diet groups: control casein (n=30), whole egg (n=12), or casein with supplemental vitamin D3 (n=12). A 6 wk pre-DSS period was followed by a 6 wk post-DSS period. After pre-DSS period, 6 rats from each diet group received DSS-treated water for 7 d. All but 18 casein-fed rats were sacrificed after colitis was induced. These 18 post-DSS treatment rats were divided into the same 3 diet groups for the final 6 wk. Pre-DSS control and DSS-treated rats on whole egg diet had serum 25-(OH)-vitamin D3 (25D) concentrations 78% higher than rats on the control casein diet, whereas D3 supplementation was without effect on serum 25D concentrations regardless of IBD status. Rats switched to whole egg after DSS-administration had serum 25D concentrations 74% higher than rats fed the casein with supplemental D3 diet. This may support new dietary recommendations regarding whole egg consumption as a strategy for vitamin D deficiency management in IBD.