Event Title

Evaluating stereotypes of university Greek life

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Psychology, Economics

Department

Psychology

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Patrick Armstrong

Project Advisor's Department

Psychology

Description

Group identity is often an integral part of an individual’s self-identity, whether or not the individual already possessed shared characteristics of the group or adapted to fit the group identity. Finding a group you identify with is often a primary concern, especially with collegiate students. However, when a student joins a group, he/she is also faced with combating the stereotypes of their new organization, no matter the accuracy of the stereotype. This study evaluated the perceived accuracy of a range of stereotypical characteristics surrounding social Greek letter organizations by both Greek-affiliated students and non-Greek students. Attitudes toward social Greek letter organizations before and during college were also assessed showing a majority of negative perceptions prior to college, even for students who eventually became a member of the Greek community. By understanding the stereotypes of and attitudes toward Greek organizations, collegiate Greek communities can better assess what action to take in order to showcase the varied benefits of Greek life and to combat negative events that may occur within the Greek community.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Evaluating stereotypes of university Greek life

Group identity is often an integral part of an individual’s self-identity, whether or not the individual already possessed shared characteristics of the group or adapted to fit the group identity. Finding a group you identify with is often a primary concern, especially with collegiate students. However, when a student joins a group, he/she is also faced with combating the stereotypes of their new organization, no matter the accuracy of the stereotype. This study evaluated the perceived accuracy of a range of stereotypical characteristics surrounding social Greek letter organizations by both Greek-affiliated students and non-Greek students. Attitudes toward social Greek letter organizations before and during college were also assessed showing a majority of negative perceptions prior to college, even for students who eventually became a member of the Greek community. By understanding the stereotypes of and attitudes toward Greek organizations, collegiate Greek communities can better assess what action to take in order to showcase the varied benefits of Greek life and to combat negative events that may occur within the Greek community.