Event Title

The Economics of Generosity: What Makes a Successful, International Charity

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

English and International Studies

Department

English

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Christiana Langenberg

Project Advisor's Department

English

Description

As a top-ranking country in generosity, our charity-giving habits often fly freely from our wallets. The world faces crises that call for action due to the sake of development, growth, relief, and compassion. However, the side effects of uninformed donations can often cause more hurt than help. In this study, I have calculated the differences between successful charities that put a dent in poverty and those that pocket generosity or cause underdevelopment to swell. Through thoughtful methods of digging into the inner politics, economics, and outputs of charity by using reported income spreadsheets of charitable corporations, surveys of the public, and a close examination of the astounding effects on third world countries, I have gathered data that will change the perspectives of those who give. The results of my study include stark, surprising contrasts of intention vs outcome between donor and corporation, with a product of new advice for the intelligent altruist, strategies for effective aid, and a look into the aftermath of a philanthropy overseas.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

The Economics of Generosity: What Makes a Successful, International Charity

As a top-ranking country in generosity, our charity-giving habits often fly freely from our wallets. The world faces crises that call for action due to the sake of development, growth, relief, and compassion. However, the side effects of uninformed donations can often cause more hurt than help. In this study, I have calculated the differences between successful charities that put a dent in poverty and those that pocket generosity or cause underdevelopment to swell. Through thoughtful methods of digging into the inner politics, economics, and outputs of charity by using reported income spreadsheets of charitable corporations, surveys of the public, and a close examination of the astounding effects on third world countries, I have gathered data that will change the perspectives of those who give. The results of my study include stark, surprising contrasts of intention vs outcome between donor and corporation, with a product of new advice for the intelligent altruist, strategies for effective aid, and a look into the aftermath of a philanthropy overseas.