Event Title

Investigating adult neural stem cell regulation using a zebrafish transplant model

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Genetics

Department

Genetics, Development, and Cellular Biology

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Donald Sakaguchi

Project Advisor's Department

Genetics, Development, and Cellular Biology

Description

Recently, stem cell-based therapies have become an important medical treatment option. Investigating factors that regulate adult stem cells to multipotency is important to understanding their plasticity potential. Restrictive internal and/or external factors affect cell plasticity, or the ability of cells to differentiate outside of their specific hierarchy. To examine plasticity, we utilized a novel transplant model where rat adult hippocampal progenitor cells (AHPCs) were transplanted into zebrafish blastulas. The utilization of a translucent fish in the blastula stage allowed effective visualization of the AHPCs. Embryos were sacrificed at one day post-fertilization. Immunohistochemistry experiments were completed to determine if the transplanted cells showed alternative fates. Transplanted AHPCs were identified using endogenous green fluorescent protein expression and examined for expression of the neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, TUJ1, and RIP. The results show no transplanted cell differentiation. In relation to location, 41% of the transplanted cells are located in the epidermis or muscle, while 20% were located in the brain or spinal cord. From these preliminary results we conclude that one-day post fertilization may be too soon for cell differentiation to occur. The high amount of cells in superficial layers of the embryos may indicate external factors impacting cellular location and differentiation.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

Investigating adult neural stem cell regulation using a zebrafish transplant model

Recently, stem cell-based therapies have become an important medical treatment option. Investigating factors that regulate adult stem cells to multipotency is important to understanding their plasticity potential. Restrictive internal and/or external factors affect cell plasticity, or the ability of cells to differentiate outside of their specific hierarchy. To examine plasticity, we utilized a novel transplant model where rat adult hippocampal progenitor cells (AHPCs) were transplanted into zebrafish blastulas. The utilization of a translucent fish in the blastula stage allowed effective visualization of the AHPCs. Embryos were sacrificed at one day post-fertilization. Immunohistochemistry experiments were completed to determine if the transplanted cells showed alternative fates. Transplanted AHPCs were identified using endogenous green fluorescent protein expression and examined for expression of the neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, TUJ1, and RIP. The results show no transplanted cell differentiation. In relation to location, 41% of the transplanted cells are located in the epidermis or muscle, while 20% were located in the brain or spinal cord. From these preliminary results we conclude that one-day post fertilization may be too soon for cell differentiation to occur. The high amount of cells in superficial layers of the embryos may indicate external factors impacting cellular location and differentiation.