Event Title

The influence of listening to activating and relaxing music on motor cortical activity post transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy young adults

Date

1-4-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Kinesiology and Health

Department

Kinesiology

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Elizabeth Stegemoller

Project Advisor's Department

Kinesiology

Description

Parkinson’s disease is caused by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which is located in the basal ganglia. The use of music has been found to improvement movement performance in person’s with Parkinson’s, but the underlying neurophysiology of this process must be explored further to understand how music can be used as a treatment for person’s with Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of this study is to combine the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the hand area of the homunculus in the motor cortex of the brain and dry, wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) activity to compare the difference in brain activity between resting, relaxing music, and activating music conditions. Single-pulse TMS (120% of RMT) was collected. The pulse was applied while resting (no music) and while passively listening to relaxing and activating music. Music conditions were randomized between participants. We hypothesize that the activating music condition will elicit greater EEG activity when compared to the resting and relaxing conditions. Cues play a large role in rehabilitation of person’s with Parkinson’s disease. Cues such as music are often paired with motor activities like walking to help people have increased movement speed and amplitude. Knowing how and why music affects the brain and motor cortical activity will help clinicians develop better interventions for person’s with Parkinson’s.

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Apr 1st, 12:00 AM

The influence of listening to activating and relaxing music on motor cortical activity post transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy young adults

Parkinson’s disease is caused by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which is located in the basal ganglia. The use of music has been found to improvement movement performance in person’s with Parkinson’s, but the underlying neurophysiology of this process must be explored further to understand how music can be used as a treatment for person’s with Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of this study is to combine the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the hand area of the homunculus in the motor cortex of the brain and dry, wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) activity to compare the difference in brain activity between resting, relaxing music, and activating music conditions. Single-pulse TMS (120% of RMT) was collected. The pulse was applied while resting (no music) and while passively listening to relaxing and activating music. Music conditions were randomized between participants. We hypothesize that the activating music condition will elicit greater EEG activity when compared to the resting and relaxing conditions. Cues play a large role in rehabilitation of person’s with Parkinson’s disease. Cues such as music are often paired with motor activities like walking to help people have increased movement speed and amplitude. Knowing how and why music affects the brain and motor cortical activity will help clinicians develop better interventions for person’s with Parkinson’s.