Date

6-12-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Global Resource Systems

College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Project Advisor

Dorothy Masinde

Project Advisor's Department

Horticulture

Description

The medicinal practices around the world are inconsistent in treatment, especially in developing countries, such as Uganda. In the district of Kamuli, Uganda, stark differences in treatment exist from one health center and hospital to another, integrating traditional medical practices (TM), often herbal, and modern, Westernized practices (WM). The purpose of this study was to compile commonly used TM used in Uganda, compare how they are integrated or replacements for WM, and analyze the benefits and drawbacks of these practices towards the safety and health of Ugandan patients. A systematic review of peer-reviewed articles on a PubMed and Google Scholar search within the last five to ten years of publication with key words “herb,” “traditional medicine,” “Uganda,” and “pregnancy” were used. The data was compiled to find trends of positive outcomes or negative consequences of these TM in comparison with WM. The results were that TM medicines have a wide range of uses in Uganda, especially within rural communities. People often turn to these treatments when they sought out WM and it did not fix their illness or was unaffordable. Several uses and their efficacies are included in this report.

File Format

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Dec 6th, 12:00 AM

The Integration of Traditional and Modern Medicine in Uganda

The medicinal practices around the world are inconsistent in treatment, especially in developing countries, such as Uganda. In the district of Kamuli, Uganda, stark differences in treatment exist from one health center and hospital to another, integrating traditional medical practices (TM), often herbal, and modern, Westernized practices (WM). The purpose of this study was to compile commonly used TM used in Uganda, compare how they are integrated or replacements for WM, and analyze the benefits and drawbacks of these practices towards the safety and health of Ugandan patients. A systematic review of peer-reviewed articles on a PubMed and Google Scholar search within the last five to ten years of publication with key words “herb,” “traditional medicine,” “Uganda,” and “pregnancy” were used. The data was compiled to find trends of positive outcomes or negative consequences of these TM in comparison with WM. The results were that TM medicines have a wide range of uses in Uganda, especially within rural communities. People often turn to these treatments when they sought out WM and it did not fix their illness or was unaffordable. Several uses and their efficacies are included in this report.