Date

6-12-2017 12:00 AM

Major

Financial Counseling and Planning

Department

Human Development and Family Studies

College

College of Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Clinton Gudmunson

Project Advisor's Department

Human Development and Family Studies

Description

This study examines the relationship between college tuition increases and student financial stress. The data used in this study comes from the 2014 National Student Financial Wellness Study and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The sample for this study is drawn from 38 public institutions and is composed of 5,693 emerging adult age college students who are in their second year or later of their degree. The analysis for this study was conducted using multi-level and ordinary least squares regression. Results of the analyses indicate that variability in student financial stress is not attributable to between institution differences. High tuition increases were not significantly associated with student financial stress. Students who engaged in more positive financial behaviors and demonstrated higher levels of financial knowledge were less likely to experience financial stress. GPA, parent education level, being male, and being a student athlete were all associated with lower financial stress scores. The findings from this study have implications for the discussion of college student financial stress occurring in the mental health, financial education, and higher education communities.

File Format

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Dec 6th, 12:00 AM

College Tuition Increases and Student Financial Stress

This study examines the relationship between college tuition increases and student financial stress. The data used in this study comes from the 2014 National Student Financial Wellness Study and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The sample for this study is drawn from 38 public institutions and is composed of 5,693 emerging adult age college students who are in their second year or later of their degree. The analysis for this study was conducted using multi-level and ordinary least squares regression. Results of the analyses indicate that variability in student financial stress is not attributable to between institution differences. High tuition increases were not significantly associated with student financial stress. Students who engaged in more positive financial behaviors and demonstrated higher levels of financial knowledge were less likely to experience financial stress. GPA, parent education level, being male, and being a student athlete were all associated with lower financial stress scores. The findings from this study have implications for the discussion of college student financial stress occurring in the mental health, financial education, and higher education communities.