Date

2019 12:00 AM

Major

Human Development and Family Studies

Department

Human Development and Family Studies

College

Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Diana Tang

Description

The relationship between children and their parents varies dramatically from family to family. Each relationship has characteristics that make it completely unique. The same is true for families that are formed through adoption. Parent-child relationships in an adoptive family have an added, unique layer that biological families do not possess. They are not biologically related, which can present some nuances in the communication patterns between adoptees and their parents. Because of this, adoptees may engage in adoption-related topic avoidance. There is existing literature that outlines common reasons for topic avoidance, but this list is not comprehensive. This project will seek to identity the motives behind the topic avoidance between individuals who are adopted and their parents. Using qualitative data collected from college students who have been adopted, the results of this study will propose new categories for topic avoidance from those adoptees. In light of these new findings, the application of the results can be used to inform future research and practical implications to address and possibly minimize the reasons for such topic avoidance.

File Format

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Reasons for Adoption-Related Topic Avoidance

The relationship between children and their parents varies dramatically from family to family. Each relationship has characteristics that make it completely unique. The same is true for families that are formed through adoption. Parent-child relationships in an adoptive family have an added, unique layer that biological families do not possess. They are not biologically related, which can present some nuances in the communication patterns between adoptees and their parents. Because of this, adoptees may engage in adoption-related topic avoidance. There is existing literature that outlines common reasons for topic avoidance, but this list is not comprehensive. This project will seek to identity the motives behind the topic avoidance between individuals who are adopted and their parents. Using qualitative data collected from college students who have been adopted, the results of this study will propose new categories for topic avoidance from those adoptees. In light of these new findings, the application of the results can be used to inform future research and practical implications to address and possibly minimize the reasons for such topic avoidance.