Date

2019 12:00 AM

Major

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

College

Human Sciences

Project Advisor

Marian Kohut

Description

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is greatest among Hispanics of Mexican descent. In this project, a culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention targeting diet, exercise and psychosocial factors was delivered to Mexican immigrants living in Iowa. Participants were randomly assigned to a 6-week intervention or a control group. Blood was collected prior to (PRE) and at six months after the intervention (POST) to measure biomarkers associated with Type 2 diabetes and examine cellular pathways that may contribute to the disease process. The results showed a significant decrease from PRE to POST in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure that reflects blood glucose level over the prior 2-3 months. The reduction of HbA1c was found in both intervention and control participants. In a subset of individuals, inflammatory proteins were measured in blood monocytes, as inflammatory pathways have been associated with the diabetes disease process. After the intervention, a reduction in the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β was observed, and the ratio of pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory proteins was skewed towards less inflammation. Greater IL-1β was significantly correlated with HbA1c. These findings demonstrate a relationship between inflammation and blood glucose level in Mexican immigrants, and show some promise for a culturally appropriate intervention in reducing risk of diabetes.

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Effect of a culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention on biomarkers for diabetes among Mexican immigrants

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is greatest among Hispanics of Mexican descent. In this project, a culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention targeting diet, exercise and psychosocial factors was delivered to Mexican immigrants living in Iowa. Participants were randomly assigned to a 6-week intervention or a control group. Blood was collected prior to (PRE) and at six months after the intervention (POST) to measure biomarkers associated with Type 2 diabetes and examine cellular pathways that may contribute to the disease process. The results showed a significant decrease from PRE to POST in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure that reflects blood glucose level over the prior 2-3 months. The reduction of HbA1c was found in both intervention and control participants. In a subset of individuals, inflammatory proteins were measured in blood monocytes, as inflammatory pathways have been associated with the diabetes disease process. After the intervention, a reduction in the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β was observed, and the ratio of pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory proteins was skewed towards less inflammation. Greater IL-1β was significantly correlated with HbA1c. These findings demonstrate a relationship between inflammation and blood glucose level in Mexican immigrants, and show some promise for a culturally appropriate intervention in reducing risk of diabetes.