Date

2019 12:00 AM

Major

Chemical Engineering

Department

Chemical and Biological Engineering

College

Engineering

Project Advisor

Rebecca Cademartri

Description

Bacteriophage can be used as an antibacterial agent in a wide range of applications. T4, T5, and T7 bacteriophage kill E. coli, a pathogenic bacteria involved in food poisoning and product recalls. To prevent infections, bacteriophage can be applied to food and medical packaging materials. It was hypothesized the T7 bacteriophage would give the best adhesion based on its small size, bacteriophage would adhere best to porous materials, and low bacteriophage concentrations would show minimal activity. The hypothesis was tested by submerging various food and medical packaging materials in each bacteriophage for 15 minutes, then plating the materials on agar before and after drying in a desiccator for 45 minutes. The lysis area of each material was analyzed, and the porous and nonporous material with the greatest area were chosen for further study. Bacteriophage concentration was varied and bacteriophage were exposed to different pH and salt solutions to test adhesion strength. The nonporous material showed greater lysis area under varied concentrations, and the porous material showed greater area after varied pH and salt exposure. The T4 bacteriophage best adhered to both materials based on greatest lysis area. Thus, surface properties and porosity of packaging material can both affect bacteriophage adhesion.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Application of Bacteriophage to Packaging Materials for Prevention of Pathogenic E. coli

Bacteriophage can be used as an antibacterial agent in a wide range of applications. T4, T5, and T7 bacteriophage kill E. coli, a pathogenic bacteria involved in food poisoning and product recalls. To prevent infections, bacteriophage can be applied to food and medical packaging materials. It was hypothesized the T7 bacteriophage would give the best adhesion based on its small size, bacteriophage would adhere best to porous materials, and low bacteriophage concentrations would show minimal activity. The hypothesis was tested by submerging various food and medical packaging materials in each bacteriophage for 15 minutes, then plating the materials on agar before and after drying in a desiccator for 45 minutes. The lysis area of each material was analyzed, and the porous and nonporous material with the greatest area were chosen for further study. Bacteriophage concentration was varied and bacteriophage were exposed to different pH and salt solutions to test adhesion strength. The nonporous material showed greater lysis area under varied concentrations, and the porous material showed greater area after varied pH and salt exposure. The T4 bacteriophage best adhered to both materials based on greatest lysis area. Thus, surface properties and porosity of packaging material can both affect bacteriophage adhesion.