Date

2019 12:00 AM

Major

Psychology; World Languages and Cultures

Department

Psychology; World Languages and Cultures

College

Liberal Arts and Sciences

Project Advisor

Loreto Prieto

Description

As of 2019, there are at least 57 million Latinx persons living in the United States (CPS, U.S. Census Bureau, 2018), with many being first- or second-generation immigrants. These individuals face serious linguistic and cultural barriers when utilizing psychotherapy, including the effect of acculturative forces and acquiring English as a second language. I reviewed the last decade of psychological literature surrounding ethnic identity issues, the interplay of language and emotion in psychotherapy, the cultural values of Latinx people, and how these factors manifest in the psychotherapy process. Latinx cultural values call for professionalism, respect, and amiability from clinicians when delivering psychotherapy to Latinx clientele. Depending on the level of acculturation of Latinx clientele to the US majority culture, psychotherapy is likely best carried out with a high degree of structure and more formal clinical interactions. Upon reviewing the current standards of training for psychologists, I have determined that delivering culturally and linguistically-sensitive therapy to Latinx clientele requires a significant level of additional training for most European American or non-Spanish speaking clinicians, including the acquisition of Spanish-speaking skills, using clinical assessment devices normed for the Latinx population, and employing structured psychotherapy practices driven by Latinx cultural values that maintain formality in the therapeutic alliance. As well, the routine assessment Latinx clients' language preferences and clinician’s use of bilingual interactions in psychotherapy can be beneficial practices.

File Format

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Spanish-speaking European American mental health clinicians and Spanish-speaking Latinx clientele: A literature review

As of 2019, there are at least 57 million Latinx persons living in the United States (CPS, U.S. Census Bureau, 2018), with many being first- or second-generation immigrants. These individuals face serious linguistic and cultural barriers when utilizing psychotherapy, including the effect of acculturative forces and acquiring English as a second language. I reviewed the last decade of psychological literature surrounding ethnic identity issues, the interplay of language and emotion in psychotherapy, the cultural values of Latinx people, and how these factors manifest in the psychotherapy process. Latinx cultural values call for professionalism, respect, and amiability from clinicians when delivering psychotherapy to Latinx clientele. Depending on the level of acculturation of Latinx clientele to the US majority culture, psychotherapy is likely best carried out with a high degree of structure and more formal clinical interactions. Upon reviewing the current standards of training for psychologists, I have determined that delivering culturally and linguistically-sensitive therapy to Latinx clientele requires a significant level of additional training for most European American or non-Spanish speaking clinicians, including the acquisition of Spanish-speaking skills, using clinical assessment devices normed for the Latinx population, and employing structured psychotherapy practices driven by Latinx cultural values that maintain formality in the therapeutic alliance. As well, the routine assessment Latinx clients' language preferences and clinician’s use of bilingual interactions in psychotherapy can be beneficial practices.