Start Date

3-12-1992 12:00 AM

Description

Reduced and no-tillage systems for crop production are increasing in importance as part of soil conservation programs throughout most of the USA. Some of the current interest is the result of the Federal Farm Program and the need to be in compliance with farm plans. For some soybean producers, adoption of some form of reduced tillage will be the only way they can continue to raise soybean on certain fields. Some growers are also adopting reduced tillage as a soil stewardship practice and also as a means of reducing equipment and labor costs and to improve profits. This new method of producing soybean has several implications not only for the soybean farmer, but also for the seed, chemical and fertilizer industry. The following discussion centers around changes in soybean management that will enhance success with reduced tillage, maximize yields and thereby improve profitability.

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Dec 3rd, 12:00 AM

Improving Soybean Profits with Management

Reduced and no-tillage systems for crop production are increasing in importance as part of soil conservation programs throughout most of the USA. Some of the current interest is the result of the Federal Farm Program and the need to be in compliance with farm plans. For some soybean producers, adoption of some form of reduced tillage will be the only way they can continue to raise soybean on certain fields. Some growers are also adopting reduced tillage as a soil stewardship practice and also as a means of reducing equipment and labor costs and to improve profits. This new method of producing soybean has several implications not only for the soybean farmer, but also for the seed, chemical and fertilizer industry. The following discussion centers around changes in soybean management that will enhance success with reduced tillage, maximize yields and thereby improve profitability.