Start Date

3-12-1992 12:00 AM

Description

Recent changes in government policy and concerns for soil conservation have resulted in considerable interest in no tillage soybean production. Further, there has been a coincidental shift in narrow row production. These efforts represent an interest to increase the amount of plant residue left intact on the soil surface after planting thus reducing soil erosion and an attempt to manipulate row spacing to improve soybean yield potential. However, growers intuitively recognize that weed management becomes increasingly challenging as the amount of soil disturbance is decreased. The difficulty in weed management when seed bed preparation tillage is eliminated is the result in a shift in the field ecology that generally favors the development of weeds over crops. An understanding of the factors involved in this ecological shift is critical if effective weed management systems are to be developed for no tillage soybean production. This paper will discuss these ecological factors and describe management strategies that will effectively control weeds in no tillage soybean production.

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Dec 3rd, 12:00 AM

Theory and Practice: Weed Management In No Tillage Soybeans

Recent changes in government policy and concerns for soil conservation have resulted in considerable interest in no tillage soybean production. Further, there has been a coincidental shift in narrow row production. These efforts represent an interest to increase the amount of plant residue left intact on the soil surface after planting thus reducing soil erosion and an attempt to manipulate row spacing to improve soybean yield potential. However, growers intuitively recognize that weed management becomes increasingly challenging as the amount of soil disturbance is decreased. The difficulty in weed management when seed bed preparation tillage is eliminated is the result in a shift in the field ecology that generally favors the development of weeds over crops. An understanding of the factors involved in this ecological shift is critical if effective weed management systems are to be developed for no tillage soybean production. This paper will discuss these ecological factors and describe management strategies that will effectively control weeds in no tillage soybean production.