Start Date

2-12-1993 12:00 AM

Description

When the Southern Corn Leaf Blight (Bipolaris maydis race T = Helminthosporium maydis) epidemic devastated the corn crop throughout the Corn Belt in 1971, plant pathologists scrambled for information on the survival of this pathogen. Little information was available, but the standard answer was very simple and effective, "Plow your corn ground and rotate to another crop" (R. R. Nelson- 1971 on the Today Show). The rapid transition from "T" male sterile cytoplasm to normal cytoplasm eliminated the very susceptible host, but sanitation (plowing) and crop rotation are two of the most effective means of controlling plant diseases. If disease control, especially foliar diseases is so simple, why am I writing this paper about the management of plant diseases. There are two main reasons for concern: 1) plowing is no longer considered an acceptable means of controlling plant pathogens, and 2) many government programs, value of the crop, herbicide usage, or many other factors, some farmers choose to plant corn following corn. While most plant pathologists, entomologists, and weed scientists are aware of the problems, many farmers have done this very successfully for years. We started studying the effect of tillage on corn diseases in 1985 and have continued for nine years. My general conclusion is "the more research we do, the more questions we ask, and the more we realize how little we know."

Share

COinS
 
Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

Effect of Tillage and Other Management Strategies on Plant Diseases

When the Southern Corn Leaf Blight (Bipolaris maydis race T = Helminthosporium maydis) epidemic devastated the corn crop throughout the Corn Belt in 1971, plant pathologists scrambled for information on the survival of this pathogen. Little information was available, but the standard answer was very simple and effective, "Plow your corn ground and rotate to another crop" (R. R. Nelson- 1971 on the Today Show). The rapid transition from "T" male sterile cytoplasm to normal cytoplasm eliminated the very susceptible host, but sanitation (plowing) and crop rotation are two of the most effective means of controlling plant diseases. If disease control, especially foliar diseases is so simple, why am I writing this paper about the management of plant diseases. There are two main reasons for concern: 1) plowing is no longer considered an acceptable means of controlling plant pathogens, and 2) many government programs, value of the crop, herbicide usage, or many other factors, some farmers choose to plant corn following corn. While most plant pathologists, entomologists, and weed scientists are aware of the problems, many farmers have done this very successfully for years. We started studying the effect of tillage on corn diseases in 1985 and have continued for nine years. My general conclusion is "the more research we do, the more questions we ask, and the more we realize how little we know."

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.