Start Date

1-12-1994 12:00 AM

Description

In an effort to reduce the amount of herbicide lost with sediment and water in runoff from a field, farmers are considering using best management practices (BMP's) related to land, crop, and pesticide management. Conservation tillage, pesticide incorporation, contour farming, filter strips and setbacks from water, terraces, contour farming, and pesticide application timing are just a few of the BMP's that could be considered. These practices allows farmers to be competitive in the market, as well as allowing them to effectively use fertilizers and pesticides with minimal losses to the environment. One BMP being strongly recommended today is the use of vegetative filter strips and/ or buffer strip. Vegetative filter strips can be defined as a strip of land that lies between the runoff area from a field and the runoff exit or drainage site at the edge or within the field. For example, a strip of grass might be placed between a fields watershed and a stream, or a strip may be placed radially around a tile inlet within a field. The benefits of such a strip would be the filtering effects of sediment and pesticides as the runoff passes over the grass. The roughness of the grassed surface would also slow down the runoff velocity, allowing potential for increased infiltration and sedimentation. Buffer strips can be defined as an area where no chemical has been applied so as to act as a buffer between an chemically applied area and a point of departure from the field. This could also be defined as a setback area. For the remainder of this paper, the term buffer strip, with or without vegetation, will be used for simplification.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-481

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Effectiveness of Buffer Strips in Reducing Herbicide Losses

In an effort to reduce the amount of herbicide lost with sediment and water in runoff from a field, farmers are considering using best management practices (BMP's) related to land, crop, and pesticide management. Conservation tillage, pesticide incorporation, contour farming, filter strips and setbacks from water, terraces, contour farming, and pesticide application timing are just a few of the BMP's that could be considered. These practices allows farmers to be competitive in the market, as well as allowing them to effectively use fertilizers and pesticides with minimal losses to the environment. One BMP being strongly recommended today is the use of vegetative filter strips and/ or buffer strip. Vegetative filter strips can be defined as a strip of land that lies between the runoff area from a field and the runoff exit or drainage site at the edge or within the field. For example, a strip of grass might be placed between a fields watershed and a stream, or a strip may be placed radially around a tile inlet within a field. The benefits of such a strip would be the filtering effects of sediment and pesticides as the runoff passes over the grass. The roughness of the grassed surface would also slow down the runoff velocity, allowing potential for increased infiltration and sedimentation. Buffer strips can be defined as an area where no chemical has been applied so as to act as a buffer between an chemically applied area and a point of departure from the field. This could also be defined as a setback area. For the remainder of this paper, the term buffer strip, with or without vegetation, will be used for simplification.

 

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