Start Date

18-11-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Field experiments in no-till soybean and corn residue were conducted to evaluate six liquid swine manure application methods. The methods were injection with a conventional knife or sweep, incorporation with tandem disk after broadcast application, broadcast application, injection with a narrow-profile knife, and surface application behind row cleaners. The row cleaner and all injection treatments used finger-closing wheels. Air samples over the soil surface were obtained during and after application and residue cover was measured. Odor level was measured by the amount of air dilutions to reach odor threshold. Placement of material into the soil was evaluated with dye. Incorporation techniques typically reduced odor level by a factor of four to ten as compared to a broadcast application. Differences among application methods were more pronounced in soybean residue. Application by the narrow-profile knife, row cleaner, and to a lesser extent the conventional knife maintained soybean residue cover better than other incorporation methods and limited odor similar to other incorporation methods. Differences among methods in odor level and residue cover were less in corn. The knife and row cleaner methods maintained greater corn residue cover than other incorporation techniques, but were more variable in odor level. For both crops, broadcast application maintained the greatest residue cover, but had the highest odor level. Material was incorporated five to seven inches deep by the knife, sweep, and narrow knife; two to three inches deep by the tandem disk and row cleaner; and at the surface by broadcast application.

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Nov 18th, 12:00 AM

Manue Application Effects on Residue, Odor, and Placement

Field experiments in no-till soybean and corn residue were conducted to evaluate six liquid swine manure application methods. The methods were injection with a conventional knife or sweep, incorporation with tandem disk after broadcast application, broadcast application, injection with a narrow-profile knife, and surface application behind row cleaners. The row cleaner and all injection treatments used finger-closing wheels. Air samples over the soil surface were obtained during and after application and residue cover was measured. Odor level was measured by the amount of air dilutions to reach odor threshold. Placement of material into the soil was evaluated with dye. Incorporation techniques typically reduced odor level by a factor of four to ten as compared to a broadcast application. Differences among application methods were more pronounced in soybean residue. Application by the narrow-profile knife, row cleaner, and to a lesser extent the conventional knife maintained soybean residue cover better than other incorporation methods and limited odor similar to other incorporation methods. Differences among methods in odor level and residue cover were less in corn. The knife and row cleaner methods maintained greater corn residue cover than other incorporation techniques, but were more variable in odor level. For both crops, broadcast application maintained the greatest residue cover, but had the highest odor level. Material was incorporated five to seven inches deep by the knife, sweep, and narrow knife; two to three inches deep by the tandem disk and row cleaner; and at the surface by broadcast application.