Start Date

18-11-1997 12:00 AM

Description

The development of high yielding, disease resistant hybrids is the goal of most public and private corn breeding programs. These programs have largely been successful in reducing the incidence and severity of foliar diseases of corn in the U.S. Significant, damaging levels of leaf diseases are considered the exception throughout most of the corn belt, and a healthy corn crop the norm. This highly desirable situation did not arise by chance or good fortune, but rather is the result of dedicated efforts of corn breeders and pathologists over the decades. Unlike most other crops, corn breeders have been able to successfully integrate quantitative resistance into their elite germplasm and select for it during the breeding process. Single, race-specific genes have been used in corn to a limited extent, but their use has largely been abandoned due to the well documented ability of pathogens to overcome this type of resistance and the conservative nature of the backcross breeding methods used to incorporate these genes into elite lines.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-580

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Nov 18th, 12:00 AM

Breeding for Quantitative Resistance to Leaf Blights of Corn: A Continuing Success Story

The development of high yielding, disease resistant hybrids is the goal of most public and private corn breeding programs. These programs have largely been successful in reducing the incidence and severity of foliar diseases of corn in the U.S. Significant, damaging levels of leaf diseases are considered the exception throughout most of the corn belt, and a healthy corn crop the norm. This highly desirable situation did not arise by chance or good fortune, but rather is the result of dedicated efforts of corn breeders and pathologists over the decades. Unlike most other crops, corn breeders have been able to successfully integrate quantitative resistance into their elite germplasm and select for it during the breeding process. Single, race-specific genes have been used in corn to a limited extent, but their use has largely been abandoned due to the well documented ability of pathogens to overcome this type of resistance and the conservative nature of the backcross breeding methods used to incorporate these genes into elite lines.

 

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