Start Date

18-11-1997 12:00 AM

Description

Soybean plants are subject to a wide array of stresses that ultimately render the plants susceptible to pathogens. Stresses can be classified in four categories: physical, biological, chemical, and physiological. Physical stresses include extreme variation in factors such as temperature and moisture. Conditions such as cold and wet soils are unfavorable to soybean plant growth, but are conducive to many root diseases. Similarly, agricultural chemicals such as fertilizers and herbicides, when applied in excessive amounts, can lead to increase in root diseases in soybean. Infestations by other pests, such as soybean cyst nematode and insects, can stress soybean plants and result in higher severity of certain fungal diseases. Even in the absence of physical and chemical stresses, soybean plants may still succumb to physiological stress as the plants grow into certain phenological stages. Perhaps, the most critical phases in plant development are at the onset of flowering, pod formation and filling. During these stages, most of the plant photosynthates are directed to the reproductive parts, and other plant parts such as roots and leaves become easily invaded by various organisms. An effective management of stress-related diseases in soybean resides in a good understanding of how various stress factors affect the interaction between pathogens and soybean plants.

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Nov 18th, 12:00 AM

Stress Related Soybean Diseases

Soybean plants are subject to a wide array of stresses that ultimately render the plants susceptible to pathogens. Stresses can be classified in four categories: physical, biological, chemical, and physiological. Physical stresses include extreme variation in factors such as temperature and moisture. Conditions such as cold and wet soils are unfavorable to soybean plant growth, but are conducive to many root diseases. Similarly, agricultural chemicals such as fertilizers and herbicides, when applied in excessive amounts, can lead to increase in root diseases in soybean. Infestations by other pests, such as soybean cyst nematode and insects, can stress soybean plants and result in higher severity of certain fungal diseases. Even in the absence of physical and chemical stresses, soybean plants may still succumb to physiological stress as the plants grow into certain phenological stages. Perhaps, the most critical phases in plant development are at the onset of flowering, pod formation and filling. During these stages, most of the plant photosynthates are directed to the reproductive parts, and other plant parts such as roots and leaves become easily invaded by various organisms. An effective management of stress-related diseases in soybean resides in a good understanding of how various stress factors affect the interaction between pathogens and soybean plants.