Start Date

18-11-1997 12:00 AM

Description

The success of integrated weed management relies on matching control strategies to the specific weed problem in a field. This requires information not only on what weed species and how many of these weeds are present in a field, but also knowledge of the distribution of the weeds throughout the field and the stage of development of these weeds. Weed control recommendations typically provide information on appropriate tillage methods and herbicide selection. The information concerning weed infestations used to base these recommendations typically is not of sufficient detail to optimize the efficiency of these strategies. Information on weed populations can be improved by increasing the time spent scouting fields. However, time restraints during the busy spring season restrict this opportunity. This problem could be alleviated with an improved understanding of the environmental influences on weed emergence and growth, therefore allowing us to predict when best to invest time in scouting. Armed with greater knowledge of weed development and populations, a person could determine the optimum time for tillage and crop planting to reduce weed populations, maximizing the effectiveness of mechanical weed control operations, and for timing of bumdown and postemergence herbicide applications. Although there has been considerable research and modeling of weed emergence in recent years, little effort has been directed toward development of emergence information for persons involved in weed management. This paper provides information on how weed emergence timing influences weed management systems. Included are preliminary rankings of relative emergence for important weed species in the Midwest. The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and USDA-ARS are supporting efforts to develop more precise emergence indices that will be of greater benefit in aiding the development of more efficient weed management systems.

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Nov 18th, 12:00 AM

Relative Emergence of Weeds of Corn and Soybean

The success of integrated weed management relies on matching control strategies to the specific weed problem in a field. This requires information not only on what weed species and how many of these weeds are present in a field, but also knowledge of the distribution of the weeds throughout the field and the stage of development of these weeds. Weed control recommendations typically provide information on appropriate tillage methods and herbicide selection. The information concerning weed infestations used to base these recommendations typically is not of sufficient detail to optimize the efficiency of these strategies. Information on weed populations can be improved by increasing the time spent scouting fields. However, time restraints during the busy spring season restrict this opportunity. This problem could be alleviated with an improved understanding of the environmental influences on weed emergence and growth, therefore allowing us to predict when best to invest time in scouting. Armed with greater knowledge of weed development and populations, a person could determine the optimum time for tillage and crop planting to reduce weed populations, maximizing the effectiveness of mechanical weed control operations, and for timing of bumdown and postemergence herbicide applications. Although there has been considerable research and modeling of weed emergence in recent years, little effort has been directed toward development of emergence information for persons involved in weed management. This paper provides information on how weed emergence timing influences weed management systems. Included are preliminary rankings of relative emergence for important weed species in the Midwest. The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and USDA-ARS are supporting efforts to develop more precise emergence indices that will be of greater benefit in aiding the development of more efficient weed management systems.

 

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