Start Date

2-12-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Rapid change is occurring in Iowa cropping practices. There have been significant shifts in the practices farmers follow in just the past few years. Cultivation practices, the introduction of genetically modified crops, rapidly changing farm prices and other events have significantly affected returns to land, labor, and management. This paper presents summary statistics and initial analysis from the 1998 cropping practices survey. The data were collected as an expansion of the USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Study. The Iowa State University Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture provided the funding to expand the survey. Farmers were randomly selected and the data was collected from one of their fields. The data presented are for 62 fields with com following com (referred throughout as "continuous com"); 315 fields with rotated com; and 365 soybean fields. In addition to the 1998 survey, selected comparisons and references will be made to similar surveys conducted in 1989, 1994, and 1996. The 1989 survey summary can be found in ISU Extension Publication FM1849. The 1994 and 1996 surveys are summarized in various USDA publications. Data from the 1996 survey were expanded in a similar manner to this survey.

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Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

1998 Iowa Cropping Practices

Rapid change is occurring in Iowa cropping practices. There have been significant shifts in the practices farmers follow in just the past few years. Cultivation practices, the introduction of genetically modified crops, rapidly changing farm prices and other events have significantly affected returns to land, labor, and management. This paper presents summary statistics and initial analysis from the 1998 cropping practices survey. The data were collected as an expansion of the USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Study. The Iowa State University Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture provided the funding to expand the survey. Farmers were randomly selected and the data was collected from one of their fields. The data presented are for 62 fields with com following com (referred throughout as "continuous com"); 315 fields with rotated com; and 365 soybean fields. In addition to the 1998 survey, selected comparisons and references will be made to similar surveys conducted in 1989, 1994, and 1996. The 1989 survey summary can be found in ISU Extension Publication FM1849. The 1994 and 1996 surveys are summarized in various USDA publications. Data from the 1996 survey were expanded in a similar manner to this survey.