Start Date

2-12-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Farmers in Iowa and other Midwest states introduced soybeans into their cropping systems in the 1940's and 1950's, usually seeding the crop with the same wide-row (38- to 40-inch between row spacing) planter used for corn. In the 1960's and 1970's Iowa State researchers reported a consistent yield increase when soybeans were planted in narrow rows (10 to 20 inches between rows) versus traditional "wide" rows. Improved plant distribution and greater sunlight interception efficiency were cited as reasons for the yield response (Shibles and Weber, 1966; Shaw and Weber, 1967; Benson and Shroyer, 1978). At the time, most farmers depended on mechanical weed control practices (i.e. considerable pre-plant tillage and inter-row cultivation during early vegetative growth), so relatively few soybean acres were planted using no-till, narrow-row practices.

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Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

Management Practices for Improved Soybean Profits

Farmers in Iowa and other Midwest states introduced soybeans into their cropping systems in the 1940's and 1950's, usually seeding the crop with the same wide-row (38- to 40-inch between row spacing) planter used for corn. In the 1960's and 1970's Iowa State researchers reported a consistent yield increase when soybeans were planted in narrow rows (10 to 20 inches between rows) versus traditional "wide" rows. Improved plant distribution and greater sunlight interception efficiency were cited as reasons for the yield response (Shibles and Weber, 1966; Shaw and Weber, 1967; Benson and Shroyer, 1978). At the time, most farmers depended on mechanical weed control practices (i.e. considerable pre-plant tillage and inter-row cultivation during early vegetative growth), so relatively few soybean acres were planted using no-till, narrow-row practices.