Start Date

2-12-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Different plant pathogens have different environmental requirements for growth and survival. As the weather changes from season to season, so does the prevalence of certain pathogens. This natural cycle results in a changing disease picture in production systems and poses a challenge for soybean producers. Changes in farming technology, farming practices, soybean germplasm, and climate often are followed by changes in plant diseases. In the last ten years, growers in Iowa as well as rest of the north-central region of the U.S. have witnessed dramatic changes in soybean diseases including observed epidemics of some new or re-emerging diseases. For example, soybean brown stem rot used to be called a billion dollar disease in the 80's, this cool season disease occurred frequently before the 1990's, but hasn't reached epidemic levels in Iowa since the 1993 epidemic. With the adoption of narrow row soybeans, white mold, also a cool season disease, increasingly became epidemic in northern and central Iowa with the severest damage in 1996.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-654

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Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

Biology and Management of Soybean Diseases Increasing in Importance to Iowa Soybean Production

Different plant pathogens have different environmental requirements for growth and survival. As the weather changes from season to season, so does the prevalence of certain pathogens. This natural cycle results in a changing disease picture in production systems and poses a challenge for soybean producers. Changes in farming technology, farming practices, soybean germplasm, and climate often are followed by changes in plant diseases. In the last ten years, growers in Iowa as well as rest of the north-central region of the U.S. have witnessed dramatic changes in soybean diseases including observed epidemics of some new or re-emerging diseases. For example, soybean brown stem rot used to be called a billion dollar disease in the 80's, this cool season disease occurred frequently before the 1990's, but hasn't reached epidemic levels in Iowa since the 1993 epidemic. With the adoption of narrow row soybeans, white mold, also a cool season disease, increasingly became epidemic in northern and central Iowa with the severest damage in 1996.

 

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