Presenter Information

Jon Tollefson, Iowa State University

Start Date

2-12-1999 12:00 AM

Description

At this meeting you have already heard that the northern com rootworm can be a pest of rotated com. The western com rootworm also has been reported in rotated com. In one of the workshops, Dr. Mike Gray, an invited speaker from the University of Illinois, will explain the adaptation of the western com rootworm to com grown in rotation. Recently the western com rootworm has been reported in rotated Iowa com as well. The Iowa Extension Crop Specialist from northeast Iowa, Brian Lang, was aware of a grower in Allamakee County that has had root lodging in his rotated com for several years. During this past season, Brian placed traps in one of the grower's fields to capture beetles as they emerged from the soil. The presence of beetles in the traps would indicate that com rootworm eggs were in the soil and larvae had survived on the crop of first-year com. Over a three-week period Brian's traps averaged a total of 14 western com rootworm and 1.5 northern com rootworm beetles. The presence of adult northern com rootworms could be explained by extended diapause as Marlin discussed. The adult western com rootworms could mean that they also are capable of extended diapause or that the western is laying eggs in Iowa soybeans as they are east of us. During the next crop season we will be attempting to determine the extent and the reason for western com rootworm survival in rotated Iowa com.

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Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

New Solutions in Con Rootworm Control

At this meeting you have already heard that the northern com rootworm can be a pest of rotated com. The western com rootworm also has been reported in rotated com. In one of the workshops, Dr. Mike Gray, an invited speaker from the University of Illinois, will explain the adaptation of the western com rootworm to com grown in rotation. Recently the western com rootworm has been reported in rotated Iowa com as well. The Iowa Extension Crop Specialist from northeast Iowa, Brian Lang, was aware of a grower in Allamakee County that has had root lodging in his rotated com for several years. During this past season, Brian placed traps in one of the grower's fields to capture beetles as they emerged from the soil. The presence of beetles in the traps would indicate that com rootworm eggs were in the soil and larvae had survived on the crop of first-year com. Over a three-week period Brian's traps averaged a total of 14 western com rootworm and 1.5 northern com rootworm beetles. The presence of adult northern com rootworms could be explained by extended diapause as Marlin discussed. The adult western com rootworms could mean that they also are capable of extended diapause or that the western is laying eggs in Iowa soybeans as they are east of us. During the next crop season we will be attempting to determine the extent and the reason for western com rootworm survival in rotated Iowa com.

 

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