Presenter Information

Kevin Van Dee, Iowa State University

Start Date

30-11-2000 12:00 AM

Description

Many producers have become interested in growing crops using sustainable and/or organic systems. Interest has grown because many of these producers want to reduce or eliminate pesticide use while taking advantage of premiums paid for pesticide-free or organic crops. Although there are many obstacles to overcome when shifting to these types of production systems, one of the biggest hurdles to overcome is achieving good weed control without synthetic chemicals. At Iowa State University's Southeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Crawfordsville, Iowa, we have begun studying an organic production system to better understand the requirements for such a system. This system was begun in a field that had been in a com/soybean rotation through 1997 where herbicide use was the primary method for controlling weeds. In 1998, we entered our three-year transition period to an organic production system. Our system involves many strategies for controlling weeds that will be discussed below. These strategies include using crop rotations, cover crops, delayed planting methods, and cultivation both before and after planting.

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Nov 30th, 12:00 AM

Weed Control Options for Organic and Sustainable Production Systems

Many producers have become interested in growing crops using sustainable and/or organic systems. Interest has grown because many of these producers want to reduce or eliminate pesticide use while taking advantage of premiums paid for pesticide-free or organic crops. Although there are many obstacles to overcome when shifting to these types of production systems, one of the biggest hurdles to overcome is achieving good weed control without synthetic chemicals. At Iowa State University's Southeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Crawfordsville, Iowa, we have begun studying an organic production system to better understand the requirements for such a system. This system was begun in a field that had been in a com/soybean rotation through 1997 where herbicide use was the primary method for controlling weeds. In 1998, we entered our three-year transition period to an organic production system. Our system involves many strategies for controlling weeds that will be discussed below. These strategies include using crop rotations, cover crops, delayed planting methods, and cultivation both before and after planting.