Start Date

6-12-2001 12:00 AM

Description

Global positioning systems (GPS), yield monitors, various forms of remote sensing, new computer software, and variable rate technology are new tools available to producers. Intensive soil sampling and crop scouting methods that directly relate each sample or measurement with their geographical coordinates complement the new technological package. Soil testing is a diagnostic tool that adapts well to site-specific management because it can assess nutrient availability of different areas within a field. Intensive sampling, soil test mapping, and variable-rate application of fertilizers or manure can improve the efficacy of nutrient management compared with the conventional practice of applying a uniform rate across a field. However, the spatial variation of nutrients within fields makes soil sampling one of the most important sources of error in soil testing, and may also be a limiting factor for optimal use of these new technologies. Traditional soil sampling recommendations are changing to adapt to the new precision agriculture technologies. This presentation discusses soil sampling methodology and summarizes results of Iowa research conducted in assorted producers' fields. This research complements other research (not discussed here) studying the effectiveness of variable-rate fertilization.

Share

COinS
 
Dec 6th, 12:00 AM

Management Zones Soil Sampling: A Better Alternative to Grid and Soil Type Sampling?

Global positioning systems (GPS), yield monitors, various forms of remote sensing, new computer software, and variable rate technology are new tools available to producers. Intensive soil sampling and crop scouting methods that directly relate each sample or measurement with their geographical coordinates complement the new technological package. Soil testing is a diagnostic tool that adapts well to site-specific management because it can assess nutrient availability of different areas within a field. Intensive sampling, soil test mapping, and variable-rate application of fertilizers or manure can improve the efficacy of nutrient management compared with the conventional practice of applying a uniform rate across a field. However, the spatial variation of nutrients within fields makes soil sampling one of the most important sources of error in soil testing, and may also be a limiting factor for optimal use of these new technologies. Traditional soil sampling recommendations are changing to adapt to the new precision agriculture technologies. This presentation discusses soil sampling methodology and summarizes results of Iowa research conducted in assorted producers' fields. This research complements other research (not discussed here) studying the effectiveness of variable-rate fertilization.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.