Start Date

6-12-2001 12:00 AM

Description

On June 18, 2001, one of us (B.L.) found soybean aphids, Aphis glycines, on VI-stage soybean plants near Decorah in northeastern Iowa. Aphids were common in river-bottom fields and the highest density was 20 aphids per plant. Most of the aphids were clustered on the youngest unexpanded trifoliate leaf. Aphids were not found on hilltop fields even though there were woodlands nearby that might harbor their alternate host, buckthorn. Thus began the second year of our experience with the soybean aphid. This paper will give a brief overview of our understanding of the soybean aphid, potential management guidelines, and insecticide performance data from neighboring states.

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Dec 6th, 12:00 AM

The Soybean Aphid: Perspectives from Across the Street

On June 18, 2001, one of us (B.L.) found soybean aphids, Aphis glycines, on VI-stage soybean plants near Decorah in northeastern Iowa. Aphids were common in river-bottom fields and the highest density was 20 aphids per plant. Most of the aphids were clustered on the youngest unexpanded trifoliate leaf. Aphids were not found on hilltop fields even though there were woodlands nearby that might harbor their alternate host, buckthorn. Thus began the second year of our experience with the soybean aphid. This paper will give a brief overview of our understanding of the soybean aphid, potential management guidelines, and insecticide performance data from neighboring states.

 

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