Start Date

30-11-2000 12:00 AM

Description

As many growers move toward specialty or value added crops, some are interested in segregating grain production by seed varieties or hi-breds within grain genetics, rather than by grain types (e. g. com, soybeans, oats). Consumer demand is driving the emergence of these value-added markets. Initial efforts have focused on developing a framework to segregate genetically modified (GMO) grain from non-GMO grain for export sale. Both traditional plant breeding and biotechnology are creating an ever-increasing array of products that require specialized management to segregate, maintain, preserve and market the trait's value. Com and soybeans carrying genes for antibiotics and industrial chemicals are being introduced and will rapidly increase over the next 3-5 years. One estimate is that there will be more than 400 pharmaceuticals produced through plants within the decade. Such products, unlike the commodity grain produced today, require segregation to take advantage of the special genetically imparted traits.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-733

Share

COinS
 
Nov 30th, 12:00 AM

Field Equipment Clean-Out for Identity-Preserved Grain Production

As many growers move toward specialty or value added crops, some are interested in segregating grain production by seed varieties or hi-breds within grain genetics, rather than by grain types (e. g. com, soybeans, oats). Consumer demand is driving the emergence of these value-added markets. Initial efforts have focused on developing a framework to segregate genetically modified (GMO) grain from non-GMO grain for export sale. Both traditional plant breeding and biotechnology are creating an ever-increasing array of products that require specialized management to segregate, maintain, preserve and market the trait's value. Com and soybeans carrying genes for antibiotics and industrial chemicals are being introduced and will rapidly increase over the next 3-5 years. One estimate is that there will be more than 400 pharmaceuticals produced through plants within the decade. Such products, unlike the commodity grain produced today, require segregation to take advantage of the special genetically imparted traits.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.