Presenter Information

Ken Ostlie, University of Minnesota

Start Date

4-12-2003 12:00 AM

Description

The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura) made its presence known in the U.S. during the summer of 2000. Over the last 3 years, this native of eastern Asia has quickly established itself as a key pest of soybean. Several features make the soybean aphid a "pest to be reckoned with", including its winter hardiness, short and long-range dispersal capabilities, tremendous reproductive potential through cloning, and its physiological impact on soybean. In a crop already struggling against increasing disease pressure and questionable profitability, the soybean aphid has the potential to reshape soybean production. Both growers and their agricultural advisors wonder if and how they'll survive the "clone wars."

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-745

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Dec 4th, 12:00 AM

Soybean Aphid: Meeting the Challenges of Clone Warfare

The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura) made its presence known in the U.S. during the summer of 2000. Over the last 3 years, this native of eastern Asia has quickly established itself as a key pest of soybean. Several features make the soybean aphid a "pest to be reckoned with", including its winter hardiness, short and long-range dispersal capabilities, tremendous reproductive potential through cloning, and its physiological impact on soybean. In a crop already struggling against increasing disease pressure and questionable profitability, the soybean aphid has the potential to reshape soybean production. Both growers and their agricultural advisors wonder if and how they'll survive the "clone wars."

 

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