Presenter Information

Seth Naeve, University of Minnesota

Start Date

2-12-2004 12:00 AM

Description

Iron Deficiency Chlorosis impacts soybean yields primarily in the Western Corn Belt. Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (more commonly iron chlorosis) is a complex plant disorder that is driven primarily by a nutrient deficiency (iron), usually manifested where soil pH is greater than 7.5. Although Midwestern soils are abundant in iron, higher pH soils cause iron to be in a form that is less available to plants, i.e. it cannot be absorbed. Iron chlorosis, however, does not occur in all high pH soils. A multitude of other soil factors interact to impact iron chlorosis in soybean. Soil chemical properties such as soluble salts and calcium carbonate levels have a great impact on its severity. Excess soil water, low soil temperature, compaction, herbicides, and soil borne diseases are also important to the development of this disorder.

Share

COinS
 
Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

Iron Deficiency Chlorosis: Management for Hot Spots and Whole Fields

Iron Deficiency Chlorosis impacts soybean yields primarily in the Western Corn Belt. Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (more commonly iron chlorosis) is a complex plant disorder that is driven primarily by a nutrient deficiency (iron), usually manifested where soil pH is greater than 7.5. Although Midwestern soils are abundant in iron, higher pH soils cause iron to be in a form that is less available to plants, i.e. it cannot be absorbed. Iron chlorosis, however, does not occur in all high pH soils. A multitude of other soil factors interact to impact iron chlorosis in soybean. Soil chemical properties such as soluble salts and calcium carbonate levels have a great impact on its severity. Excess soil water, low soil temperature, compaction, herbicides, and soil borne diseases are also important to the development of this disorder.