Start Date

2-12-2004 12:00 AM

Description

Conservation systems play a significant role in improving soil and water quality. Management of crop residue and soil organic matter is of primary importance in maintaining soil productivity and in minimizing agricultural impacts on the environment. Conservation systems utilize tillage practices that are defined by the percent of residue cover left on the soil surface, such as ridge tillage, strip-tillage, and minimum-tillage. These tillage systems and no-tillage each accounted for one-third of Iowa's corn (Zea Mays L) and soybean (Glycine max L Merr.) cropland in production according to a survey conducted by the Iowa Residue Management Partnership (IRMP) in I999 (IRMP, 2000). The IRMP survey indicated the need for improvements in adopting conservation systems. According to a Conservation Technology Information Center survey (2002), in Iowa no tillage, conservation tillage, reduced tillage, and conventional tillage all remained constant over a five year period from 1997 to 2002 (Tables 1 and 2). Meanwhile over the same five years reduced and conventional tillage in the Midwest and United States remained constant, but there was a shift from conservation tillage to no-tillage.

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Dec 2nd, 12:00 AM

Conservation Tillage System Effects on Soil Productivity and Carbon Credit Incentives.

Conservation systems play a significant role in improving soil and water quality. Management of crop residue and soil organic matter is of primary importance in maintaining soil productivity and in minimizing agricultural impacts on the environment. Conservation systems utilize tillage practices that are defined by the percent of residue cover left on the soil surface, such as ridge tillage, strip-tillage, and minimum-tillage. These tillage systems and no-tillage each accounted for one-third of Iowa's corn (Zea Mays L) and soybean (Glycine max L Merr.) cropland in production according to a survey conducted by the Iowa Residue Management Partnership (IRMP) in I999 (IRMP, 2000). The IRMP survey indicated the need for improvements in adopting conservation systems. According to a Conservation Technology Information Center survey (2002), in Iowa no tillage, conservation tillage, reduced tillage, and conventional tillage all remained constant over a five year period from 1997 to 2002 (Tables 1 and 2). Meanwhile over the same five years reduced and conventional tillage in the Midwest and United States remained constant, but there was a shift from conservation tillage to no-tillage.