Start Date

1-12-2005 12:00 AM

Description

Now that the elevators are filled with grain, farm life is slowing down, and farmers in Iowa can look back at a year with generally good yields, it is important to recognize that our wealth and prosperity are not without a cost. Nationwide, herbicide use has not diminished, despite the use of glyphosate resistant genetically engineered crops (http://www.epa.gov/oppbead1/pestsales/), and intensive row-cropping in combination with the use of high rates of synthetic fertilizer and drainage tiles contributes to high concentrations of nitrate in surface waters (Randall et al., 1997; Schilling and Libra, 2000) and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico (Burkart andjames, 1999). Is it possible to run a profitable farm that better promotes human and environmental health? We are conducting an experiment in which three crop management systems are being compared with respect to weed management, crop yield, net return, labor and energy use. Two of the three systems receive reduced rates of herbicide and fertilizer inputs, while the third one is managed with conventional inputs.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-812

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Long-term Weed Management Using Diverse Crop Rotation Systems

Now that the elevators are filled with grain, farm life is slowing down, and farmers in Iowa can look back at a year with generally good yields, it is important to recognize that our wealth and prosperity are not without a cost. Nationwide, herbicide use has not diminished, despite the use of glyphosate resistant genetically engineered crops (http://www.epa.gov/oppbead1/pestsales/), and intensive row-cropping in combination with the use of high rates of synthetic fertilizer and drainage tiles contributes to high concentrations of nitrate in surface waters (Randall et al., 1997; Schilling and Libra, 2000) and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico (Burkart andjames, 1999). Is it possible to run a profitable farm that better promotes human and environmental health? We are conducting an experiment in which three crop management systems are being compared with respect to weed management, crop yield, net return, labor and energy use. Two of the three systems receive reduced rates of herbicide and fertilizer inputs, while the third one is managed with conventional inputs.

 

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